John Zacherle: From Horror To Rock ‘n’ Roll

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If John Zacherle didn’t exist, Obit Magazine would have had to invent him.  When the horror show host turned cool ghoul FM disc jockey died at the age of 98 on October 27, 2016, many baby boomers who grew up on the East Coast, particularly New York and Philadelphia, no doubt had fond memories of growing up watching him on local TV, where he hosted late-night shows like Shock Theatre and, later on, Chiller Theatre in New York on local outlet WPIX. 

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Zacherle, or Zacherley, as he was also known, was born in Philadelphia, the youngest of four children of a bank clerk father and his wife, strict parents who wouldn’t let him see horror movies while he was growing up. He received a bachelor’s degree in English lit from his hometown Ivy League University of Pennsylvania, serving in North Africa and Europe during World War II.

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Upon returning to Philadelphia, he joined a local repertory company, playing several roles – including an undertaker – in Action in the Afternoon, a western produced by local TV station WCAU which also aired in New York. He hosted Shock Theater on the same channel, which debuted on October 7, 1957, where he first developed his ghoulish undertaker character Roland, who lived in a crypt alongside his unseen wife “My Dear,” and his lab assistant Igor, interspersing bits in between the featured horror flick.

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John Zacherle (right) in 1968.

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Picture Courtesy of Pixabay

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John Zacherle would improvise scenes that included crooning “My Funny Valentine” to his wife years before Mystery Science Theater spoofed bad movies from the peanut gallery. To kids growing up in the 50s and 60s, this kind of satire put Zacherle on equal par with the iconic Mad magazine in mocking pop culture with a knowing eye.

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It was fellow Philly broadcaster Dick Clark, a good friend, who dubbed John Zacherle “The Cool Ghoul”

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With his floor-length undertaker smocks, hollowed-out cheekbones, smeared with black make-up, slicked-back hair and ghoulish pallor, he was Nosferatu crossed with Soupy Sales, every bit as capable of breaking the fourth wall of your TV set.

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His fame grew to the point that 14,000 fans showed up at the TV studio when he invited fans to meet Roland.  Zacherle even cut a single, “Dinner with Drac”, for the local Cameo label, as John Zacherle—The Cool Ghoul, a Top 10 Billboard hit which became a Halloween staple along with the “Monster Mash.”

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Famous Monsters of Filmland – Warren Publishing

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His fame included a pair of paperback horror anthologies, Zacherley’s Midnight Snacks and a sequel, Zacherley’s Vulture Stew, which came out in 1960.  That same year, he launched a Presidential campaign on Transylvania’s People’s Party (including a book Zacherley for President and a highly collectible poster set) and his first full-length album, Spook Along with Zacherley.  In 1962, Cameo released Monster Mash, which featured Zach’s vocals over instrumental tracks of hits by some of the label’s biggest stars, including Chubby Checker and Dee Dee Sharp.

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Through the ‘60s, Zach made further inroads into the emerging rock and roll, hosting several concerts.  In 1965, he hosted Zacherley’s Disc-O-Teen, a dance show which he described as Transylvania Bandstand in homage to his pal Dick Clark’s show.

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John Zacherle became a fixture on FM radio, hosting his first program on New York’s iconic rock station WNEW in morning drive before switching over to WPLJ in 1970, where he remained until 1980.  He was also the Elvira of his day, appearing in character at personal appearances at Halloween parades.

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Zacherle appeared on Saturday Night Live in 1982, made a good living doing voiceovers and hosted three TV specials in 1985 alone. By the ‘90s, his career began to settle into appearances at fan conventions, while hosting a nostalgia show for WXRK in New York.

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If that’s not scary enough, he was uncle to My Little Pony creator Bonnie Zacherle.

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For those who didn’t grow up on the East Coast, it’s hard to explain how important Zacherle was to helping instill the countercultural sensibility of irony and satire. He spoofed horror, and death, with a gleeful knowingness that brought us in on the joke. His death, after a fruitful 98 years, rather than sadden, brought a big smile to my face. Zacherle’s attitude fits in perfectly with Obitmagazine.com’s view of death – not to be feared, but faced with humor and a healthy dose of absurdity.

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